Category Archives: Triborough

Forty years of change

Open doors at Westminster Music Library

Westminster Libraries is changing. Readers will be pleased to know that no libraries are closing and opening hours are not being slashed as has happened in some other parts of London and elsewhere in the country. But from April you may see fewer and different staff in your local library as a number of staff are leaving, retiring or switching libraries. Of course libraries need to change and evolve, just like any other organisation, if they are to remain relevant to people’s changing needs and to embrace technological changes.

As one of those staff who is retiring after some 40 years, I invite you to look back at some of the key changes in Westminster Libraries over that period.

Church Street Library 1969

When I started in the 1970s there were no computers in libraries. Most libraries issued books using the Browne system. Books had a pocket holding a card which gave the book’s number and author/title details. Readers were given a number of pocket tickets with their name and address details. They tendered one of these for each book borrowed and the book’s card was placed in the pocket ticket and then filed in a rack before (or behind) a date due marker. On returning a book, the racks would be searched for the matching card and the ticket returned. Returns and renewals could only be done at the library where the books were borrowed. Readers with overdue books would receive posted reminders.

St. Marylebone library book label and pocket

However in Westminster, the libraries were so busy, especially at lunchtimes, that the Browne system was too slow to cope. Instead readers were given plastic tokens which they handed over for all but the most expensive books. There was no record of who had out what books, so no overdue letters could be sent, but once a year each reader was written to and they had to produce all their tokens or pay a forfeit. This system was to last until a computerised management system was introduced from 1984.

City of Westminster tokens

The library catalogue was a large set of drawers in which were inserted 5 inch by 3 inch cards for each book – one filed by author, and one by title or class number. The catalogue would only show books at that library, and would not show whether the book was in stock or on loan. When new books were added or old books withdrawn the cards had to be manually filed or removed. By the 1970s new technology saw the introduction of a system-wide catalogue on microform, but it still could not show whether the books were in the library or on loan. This again had to wait for computer technology.

New books were selected from ‘approval collection’s or by visiting suppliers’ showrooms. Once supplied they all had to be catalogued, processed and jacketed so it might take weeks before they reached the shelves. Non-fiction books had their class numbers embossed on the spine in gold leaf.

Gramophone records at Charing Cross Library, circa 1950s

As well as books, readers could borrow gramophone records, although there were strict rules about their care. The records themselves were not on the shelves. Instead there were display racks of the cards from which borrowers made their choice and then exchanged the card for the recording – supplied in a carrying case.

Reference libraries had shelves upon shelves of atlases, dictionaries, directories, encyclopaedias and so on, often out of date even before being published. Some directories even came in loose-leaf binders so that update replacement pages could be supplied.

Periodicals room in Marylebone Library, 1940

There were no public computers, no Internet, no wi-fi , no DVDs… since none of these had yet been invented.

Computer technology has completely transformed all of this, as it has life and work elsewhere. Readers can issue and return their loans (at any of our libraries) through self-issue terminals without queuing at the counter. They can renew online at any time and keep a historical record of what they have borrowed. The catalogue can be searched online and reservations placed from home. E-mail notification lets you know when items are due back or reservations are available. New stock will appear on the catalogue when ordered in advance of publication and will be received, ready for loan, within days of publication.

Computers at Pimlico Library - gradually getting sorted

Those groaning shelves of reference books have mostly gone now, replaced by public computers to use and study space with free wi-fi access. But don’t think that there is any less information available. Far from it. With the 24/7 library your library card gives you access to a wealth of information for free on our subscription databases. Business information, the arts, family history and worldwide newspapers are among the resources available – much of it accessible from anywhere online and – as the name suggests – available 24/7, not just when the library is open.  E-books, e-audiobooks and e-magazines are also available online.

The library service has not just changed as a result of technology though. The present City of Westminster had only been formed in 1965 under the Local Government Act 1963. It was a merger of the City of Westminster and the Boroughs of St  Marylebone and Paddington each of which had had their own library service. So there was some duplication of services which have been rationalised since.

Some of the other key changes that have happened to the library service in the last 40 years include:

1974 Pimlico Library opens in Rampayne Street. opposite the tube station. The station itself had opened in 1972, a year after the Victoria Line had been extended to Brixton.

1984 Charing Cross Library starts its specialised service to the Chinese community with the appointment of a Chinese librarian.

1987 Paddington Library basement opened up as part of the public area, allowing the integration of all the reference stock and the reading room which had previously been housed in two separate buildings.

1987  Charing Cross Library is the first Westminster library to lend videos.

1995 Westminster City Archives building opened by HRH Duke of Gloucester on 2 March 1995, bringing together the archives & local studies collections from old City of Westminster, St Marylebone and Paddington boroughs for the first time.

1997 Great Smith Street Library replaced by St James’s Library in Victoria Street, next to City Hall.

1998 The Open Learning Centre at Queen’s Park opened on 1st June 1998. It became the Learning Centre in September 2009.

2000  The Government launches The People’s Network programme to link every public library in the UK to the Internet. Public access computers were installed and staff trained through the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL).

2007  Marylebone Library moved into the Council House next door.

2008 St John’s Wood Library expanded, with the basement being opened up to public use.

2010 New enlarged Church Street Library opens, with a teenage zone and learning centre. The library had operated from a former butchers shop nearby for 2 years while the building work took place, financed by £1.1m lottery money.

2010 New Pimlico Library opens in Lupus Street, joint with Pimlico Academy and Adult Education Centre. This replaced the original Pimlico Library.

2011 St James’s Library closed and a new ‘Express Library‘ opens in the vestibule of the Archives Centre.

2012 Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham libraries come under a common Triborough management arrangement.

2013 New single library management system for Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham libraries with a combined catalogue, offering access to all three boroughs stock to all members.

2013 Marylebone Library moved to temporary premises in Beaumont Street after the Town Hall was sold to the London Business School.

Of course it hasn’t all been expansion. Over the years we have also had to reduce, rationalise or say goodbye to some areas of service. Sheet Music has been concentrated at Westminster Music Library, where staff have the specialist knowledge to serve the music community. The closure of the medical library at Marylebone was seen as a casualty at the time, although digital access to medical information is now available through the 24/7 Library.  A mobile library was introduced and operated for a few years but was not replaced when due for renewal.

There have also been proposals and ideas that never got off the ground. Among these were plans in the early 1980s to close Maida Vale and Queens Park libraries and replace them with a single library in Harrow Road at the former Paddington Town Hall. Another proposal was to move Paddington Library to a floor above the Whiteleys shopping centre in Queensway.

Library book borrowing may be in decline nationally, but our users come to the library for far more than books. They may come to study, to use the computers for a variety of purposes – social media, on-line purchases, job-hunting etc. They may come for reading or writing groups, author talks, computing or English classes, careers advice sessions, and a range of health promotions. In some libraries they can now collect goods ordered online at Amazon lockers. There may be children’s under 5s sessions, homework clubs, holiday reading clubs and craft events. Libraries provide work experience training for secondary school children. Adults can feed back into the community by volunteering in our libraries.

People have predicted the end of libraries in our present digital, connected world. Well they may have changed in ways unimaginable even a generation ago but they are still a thriving, valued part of the community. Who knows what changes another generation will bring, but I expect there will still be something people call a ‘library’. It may even still contain books – the death of the printed word has been predicted but it seems to be still going strong at present. And there to help them will be someone they will refer to as a ‘librarian’ whatever their official job title may be, or indeed whether they are employed staff or a volunteer.

[Malcolm]


Read more about library history in some of Malcolm’s previous contributions to the blog:

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Unexpected garden discovery in Marylebone

On a recent lunchtime wander around the neighbourhood, I was astonished to see this example of guerrilla gardening in the heart of Marylebone’s Harley Street medical district.

'Guerilla gardening' in Marylebone  'Guerilla gardening' in Marylebone

For those not familiar with the term, ‘guerrilla gardening’ describes the unofficial planting of seeds and plants to improve the urban environment. Typical sites include neglected planters and flower beds beside housing estates and other buildings, abandoned wasteland sites and bulb planting on grassed road verges and roundabouts.  So in an area which is generously planted with street trees and displays of bedding plants, it is surprising to find this example of a much wilder and frankly ‘untidy’ gardening.

On guerilla gardening by Richard ReynoldsFor the background to this movement and to see examples of guerrilla gardening, take a look at the following guide written by one of the London pioneers of this movement:
On guerrilla gardening: a handbook for gardening without boundaries
– Richard Reynolds

'Guerilla gardening' in MaryleboneAs the Weymouth Street example proves, one does not need a large ‘canvas’ to create a guerrilla garden. The sunflower and tomato plants have been planted around a tree in a space only 1m x 0.5m. Frankly I am astonished that they are flourishing in such an inhospitable situation! Rather embarrassingly, the exuberant tomato plant puts my own plants to shame. Apart from the hostile growing conditions next to the road, I am surprised this planting has survived the attention of human hands, whether by vandalism or ‘tidying’.

Nearby in Fulham, residents of Fabian Road are actively planting up the bare soil around pavement trees with the backing of the council, whose website currently features this short YouTube video of interviews with the gardeners:

Meanwhile, searching the library catalogue for ‘guerilla gardening’ unexpectedly turned up a novel: Guerrillas in our midst, by Claire Peate.

If unofficial gardening to brighten up the urban landscape doesn’t appeal, why not individually plant up window boxes, pots etc. or join together with neighbours in a community project? The Royal Horticultural Society has initiated the Greening Grey Britain campaign, one of several RHS campaigns which includes the Britain in Bloom and the School Gardening initiatives set up to improve the urban environment. The RHS website  gives advice and support; you can also search for volunteering opportunities. Remember that your library service stocks a number of books relating to urban and container gardening. The following titles are three examples which can be borrowed to assist you greening the urban landscape with ornamental and edible plants.

Growing up the wall by Sue Fisher Container gardening by Andrew Mikolajski The urban gardener by Matt James

One local initiative is found at Westminster’s Church Street Library , the site of a flourishing community garden. Information about and images of this project can be found in the recent post: A green oasis and a lot of fun.

[Francis]

Welcome to the Cloud Library – new ebooks now

3M Cloud Library

We’re delighted to announce that our new ebook service is now live and ready to use. The 3M Cloud Library is incredibly easy – try it and see.

We’ve offered ebooks for some time, but now we’ve moved to a bigger, better and above all easier to use service. For those of you who are already fans of ebooks from Westminster Libraries, you can continue to use the ‘old’ service alongside the new one for a while. Gradually the stock will be transferred across to 3M and eventually the westminster.libraryebooks.co.uk site will be phased out.

Here’s what you need to do to use ebooks:

  • Download the app
    Download the ‘3M Cloud Library App’ from the Apple App Store, Google Play, NOOK Storefront or install the PC or Mac 3M Cloud Library Apps.
  • Log in to your library
    Using the drop down menu, select GB – England – Westminster Libraries. Click to agree to the terms and conditions, enter your library card number and PIN (if required).
  • Browse, check out and read!
    Now you are ready to browse, check out and read ebooks from your local library.

3M Cloud Library logoYou can find out more on our ebooks page.

No fines, no late returns (ebooks automatically return after 14 days, but you can borrow again if no one has reserved the book), just lots to read.

[Ali]

New Year, New You

Osman ready to fuel the 'smoothie bike' at New Year New You, Church Street Library, January 2016

The last week of January 2016 saw three New Year New You events – one in each borough: first Westminster, then Kensington & Chelsea, and finally Hammersmith & Fulham.

Hand massages at New Year New You, Church Street Library, January 2016

The first event was at Church Street Library on 25 January, with events such as a power walk round the area, followed by a WAES ceramics session: “Have a go with clay – bring out the inner potter in you!” Riding the ‘smoothie bike’ was a challenge, but with the reward of a smoothie at the end, all generated by your own pedal power. There were opportunities to refresh your mind and body, with eyebrow threading, mini facials, hand massages, aromatherapy and Reiki – all from highly trained professionals. The Monday ESOL group sampled various foods and had a taster session of French with our French club volunteer… C’est bon appetit!

The Monday ESOL group at New Year New You, Church Street Library, January 2016

The afternoon saw yoga for relaxation, Zumba for energy and Street Dance for the young and agile. Throughout the day there were tips on healthy eating from the Stroke Association, Munro Health, Health and Fitness trainers offering blood pressure checks, cholesterol and healthy eating tips, along with Kick-It the stop smoking unit.

Cheryl from Kick It Stop Smoking service at New Year New You, Church Street Library, January 2016

Many of the same organisations attended the events at North Kensington Library two days later and Hammersmith Library at the end of the week, though each also had a local flavour. Each event was really well attended and the customers had a great time:

“Brilliant fun on the smoothie bike – harder than it looks!”

“Felt really relaxed after the facial”

“Great atmosphere”

The library was buzzing all day with customers coming back and forth to sample many different activities throughout the day. Would we do it all again next year? YES we would.

[Michaela]

It was a library, Jim, but not as we know it

Browne system issue tray. Image property of Westminster City Archives

Happy National Libraries Day!

Ask any person on the street “What is a library?” and they will probably say something like “A public building with books you can borrow”. That is indeed the case, but a modern day library offers much, much more, and a library card is the key. How? It’s all down to the development of computers and especially the Internet and World Wide Web in the 80s and 90s.

St. Marylebone library book label and pocket

Just a generation ago, things were very different. With no computers, most libraries issued books using the Browne system. Books had a pocket holding a card which gave the book’s number and author/title details. Readers were given a number of pocket tickets with their name and address details. They tendered one of these for each book borrowed and the book’s card was placed in the pocket ticket and then filed in a rack before (or behind) a date due marker. On returning a book, the racks would be searched for the matching card and the ticket returned. Returns and renewals could only be done at the library where the books were borrowed. Readers with overdue books would get posted reminders.

City of Westminster catalogue card

The library catalogue was a large set of drawers in which were inserted 5in x 3in cards for each book – one filed by author, and one by title or class number. The catalogue would only show books at that library, and would not show whether the book was in or on loan. When new books were added or old books withdrawn, the cards had to be manually filed or removed. By the 1970s, new technology saw the introduction of a system-wide catalogue on microfilm or microfiche. But it would still not show whether the books were in the library or on loan.

City of Westminster tokens

With fewer alternatives available, reading was a far more popular activity, and the library was so busy, especially at lunchtimes, that in 1952 Westminster dispensed with the Browne system. Instead readers were given plastic tokens which they handed over for all but the most expensive books. There was no record of who had out what books, so no overdue letters could be sent, but once a year each reader was written to and they had to produce all their tokens or pay a forfeit. This system was to last until a computerised management system was introduced from 1984.

City of Westminster renewal letter

As well as books, readers could borrow gramophone records, although there were strict rules about their care. The records themselves were not on the shelves. Instead there were display racks of the cards from which borrowers made their choice and then exchanged the card for the recording – supplied in a carrying case.

City of Westminster Gramophone library rules

Reference libraries had shelves upon shelves of atlases, dictionaries, directories, encyclopaedias etc, often out of date even before being published. Some directories even came in loose-leaf binders so that update replacement pages could be supplied. [I remember it well. Ed.]

Westminster Libraries still lend books, but now you can browse the catalogue of all the branches from home or while out and about on your phone, check the availability of books and reserve them online. Not just for Westminster but also Kensington & Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham libraries too. You can renew items online and return them to any library in the three boroughs.

Westminster Libraries catalogue, February 2015

We no longer have gramophone records (or the cassettes which followed them) but we do lend CDs, DVDs and Talking Books on CD. You can even get something to read or listen to without visiting a library building at all, as we have e-books, e-magazines and e-audiobooks too.

E-books from Westminster Libraries

When you visit ‘in-library’ there is more on offer than just what we lend. There may be reading clubs or writing groups, author talks, computing or English classes, careers advice sessions, and a range of health promotions. There may be children’s homework clubs and holiday reading clubs and craft events. It varies from library to library, but the website will have all the details – and if you follow us on Twitter – or just keep an eye on the right hand column of this blog – you’ll get updates on all our special events as well!

BTL Ravel workshop with Pimlico Academy students, April 2014

Those groaning shelves of reference books are much reduced now, replaced by public computers to use and study space with free wi-fi access. But don’t go thinking that there is any less information available – far from it! With the 24/7 library your library card gives you access to a staggering wealth of information for free on our subscription databases. Business information, the arts, family history and worldwide newspapers are amongst the resources available – much of it accessible from anywhere that you can get online and, as it says, available 24/7 – not just when the library is open.

Marketline - one of our many online resources

People have predicted the end of libraries in our present digital, connected world. Well they may have changed in ways unimaginable a generation ago but they are still a thriving, valued part of the community. Who knows what changes another generation will bring? I expect and hope there will still be something people call a ‘library’. But will it contain books? – well perhaps the trend is already starting…

Charing Cross Library 1948

[Malcolm, who has seen and embraced it all in his 40+ years at Westminster]

The Great Interior Design (Library) Challenge!

The Great Interior Design ChallengeFans of the BBC’s ‘Great Interior Design Challenge’ will know that the series reaches its final tomorrow, 2 December. The original field of 27 designers has reduced to just two finalists, who will be working on three rooms each within a converted stately home.

Earlier in the series, a lovely ‘Cote d’Azur’ style bedroom was created in a seaside cottage in Brixham by one of our very own library staff, Lacey.

I wondered if working amidst the library’s wide range of source material had been useful to her in her interior design exploits:

“Working in libraries has definitely played a big part in helping me with my journey in interior design (educational and personal), due to the flexible nature of the job and the wide variety of resources to choose from.
I practically used all of the amazing collections of DIY, art and design books to help me – whether I was taking inspiration from the books and resources (including magazines available in the library or e-magazines such as House and Garden, Ideal Home etc) or finding a book on the returns trolley or on the new book stand – it’s definitely been a real goldmine!”

Lacey obviously doesn’t work in every library across the three boroughs (Westminster, Kensington & Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham), but no matter – it’s easy to find and get hold of books and other stock using the joint catalogue. Lacey recommends:

Bright Bazaar, by Will Taylor The perfectly imperfect home, by Deborah Needleman Kevin McCloud’s Colour Now, by Kevin Mccloud Decorating with style by Abigail Ahern A Girl’s Guide to Decorating by Abigail Ahern Colour: a journey by Victoria Alexander

Top row, L-R: Bright Bazaar: embracing colour for make-you-smile style
by Will Taylor; The Perfectly Imperfect Home: how to decorate and live well
by Deborah Needleman; Kevin McCloud’s Colour Now: an expert guide to choosing colours for your home, by Kevin McCloud.
Bottom row, L-RDecorating with style by Abigail Ahern; A Girl’s Guide to Decorating by Abigail Ahern; Colour: a journey by Victoria Alexander.

[Ali]

Come on in, the door’s open

Access to Research‘Accessibility, sustainability, excellence: how to expand access to research publications’. There’s a snazzy title for a document that I’m sure all of you have pored over. Or maybe you know it better as the Finch Report. Or maybe you don’t know it at all?

To be honest, it doesn’t matter – all any of us need to know is that it’s a Jolly Good Thing because it recommended that publicly funded research should be available to the people who paid for it: the public. Us, in fact. So Proquest (who some of you may know as the publishers of Ancestry, the fantastic online genealogical resource) were signed up to provide the ‘Access to Research’ front-end, which is about as user-friendly as it’s possible to be, and various publishers were brought on board. The current “offer” is impressive – 8,000 journals, many with long back files, containing 4 million freely-available articles. And these are from top academic publishers, 17 of them and counting, including big names like Oxford University Press and Wiley.

The range of subjects is extraordinary – some of the topics are obscure (Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, anyone?) but there is plenty of more mainstream stuff (Journal of popular film and television for example). The point is that if you need access to research, esoteric or otherwise, and don’t belong to an academic library or have an awful lot of money at your disposal, you now have it.

So how does it work? You simply visit your local library – access is available in Westminster, Kensington & Chelsea and Hammersmith & Fulham libraries, as well as many other participating library services across the UK. Log onto a library computer and, in Westminster, go to our Online Resources. The interface couldn’t be simpler. Just enter your search terms (as with Google, you can use inverted commas around the term if you want to search for an exact phrase,  so “joan crawford” will return 102 results and joan crawford 1494). You will be asked to accept the Terms and Conditions (don’t worry – you only have to do this once each session). Do have a look at them – the most important condition is that users can’t save documents electronically although they can print out one copy of each article.  Accept the T&Cs and then look at the results.

When you click on an article, it will open up in a new tab so your results list remains open. You can read most of the articles as HTML format (like a straightforward webpage) or as a PDF (probably better if you intend to print it out ).

You don’t have to do a keyword search – you can Browse All Journals, using a drop-down menu to choose a subject. Or if you choose Advanced Search you can search by Author and narrow down your results by date.

Don’t forget to return to the original search screen to make each new search. The search results pop up on the websites of the various publishers, but if you stay there and use their own search boxes, you may find that you reach areas which are not part of the scheme, and get asked to pay unnecessarily.

This is all material that has previously not been available to The Public, only to those attached to academic institutions. So we should certainly make the most of it. Happy researching!

[Nicky]