The Life and Loves of a Victorian Clerk

Today the first week of the diary of ‘Nathaniel Bryceson’ (aka Westminster City Archives volunteer Sheldon Goodman) was published as a podcast, 170 years after it was first written. You can read – or listen to – the diary throughout the coming year at https://victorianclerk.wordpress.com/

Cemetery Club

By Sheldon

The City of London is known for many things. For centuries it has been the epicentre of trade, commerce and finance. To consider that events such as the Great Fire of London happened here are remembered largely due to the efforts of one of its most famous sons: Samuel Pepys.
Pepys, a seventeenth century naval administrator, kept his diary for seven years until poor eyesight and old age prevented him from maintaining further journals. Written in code and chronicling every day events such as watching plays, official business and the occasional tryst, much to the dismay of his wife; it is his account which keeps the embers of that rest conflagration alive to schoolchildren and adults up and down the line.
Pepys wasn’t the only one to keep a diary. Let’s move geographically and relocate to the City of Westminster, to the year of 1846. In Richmond Buildings, in…

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