Olympics for children

The Olympics: A very peculiar historyPart 5 of our Olympic Marathon – everything you could possibly need for school projects, holiday homework, or just to feed an insatiable appetite for Olympic knowledge!

The Olympics: a very peculiar history, by David Arscott
An overview of little known oddities and popular myths surrounding the Olympics, featuring athlete statistics, biographies and records.

The story of the OlympicsThe story of the Olympics, by Richard Brassey
From the story of how ethos of the games of ancient Greece has been carried into the twenty-first century, through to records and reputations, cheats and champs, victors and venues – here’s the lowdown on the Olympics.

Flaming Olympics, by Michael ColemanFlaming Olympics, by Michael Coleman
This guide tells readers everything they need to know, from the torture of Olympic training, to some of the best performances dating back as far as 776 BC. Find out more in this illuminating guide to the games. With 300 quiz questions on every Olympic event, it’s guaranteed to keep you guessing!

Olympic starOlympic stars, by Laura Durman
This is part of a series  that takes some of the world’s top celebrities and looks at how they made it in their chosen profession. Designed with a ‘magazine’ look, the books are stylishly presented and visual. They offer a snapshot of the relevant industry – in this case sport – alongside the celebrity biographies.

Olympic Sports, by Clive Gifford:
Books about the Olympics by Clive GiffordAthletics, Ball sportsCycling, Combat sportsGymnasticsSwimming and diving
This series gives young readers an exciting entry point to the main sports that feature in the world’s biggest international competition – the summer Olympic games. Each book features one group of sports, explaining the core rules, the main playing points and the appeal of each sport.

So you think you know the Olympics <div class="quiz"></div>So you think you know the Olympics, by Clive Gifford
Whether you want to test your knowledge or are keen to learn more about the biggest sporting event EVER, here are over 1000 Olympic teasers that cover everything from the history of the games and sports knowledge to weird and wonderful trivia that will put even gold medallists to the test!

The Olympics series (for younger children), by Nick Hunter
This series offers up-to-date and accessible information specific to the Olympic games in 2012. It explores the history, present day, and future of the Olympics, incorporating Paralympic and Winter Olympic information.

All about the OlympicsAll about the Olympics
Designed to link into the London 2012 Olympic Games, this title provides a starting point for young children learning about the Olympics, looking at what the Olympic movement is all about, and how they can live the Olympic ideal.

Also Behind the scenes at the Olympic Games, The London Olympics 2012, Inside the Olympics, Olympic champions, Olympic sports, The Paralympics, The world of Olympics.

Great Olympic MomentsGreat Olympic moments, by Michael Hurley
This book covers basic history, provides a map of all the cities that have hosted the games, and highlights interesting tidbits such as the story of the swimmer from Equitorial Guinea who was not used to swimming more than 50 meters in his homeland yet won his race by default after his competitors were disqualified for false starts.

The OlympicsThe Olympics, by Sarah Ridley
Join Ash, Scully and the rest of the Espresso team to find out about the Olympic Games. Explore how the Olympics, as well as the Winter Olympics and Paralympics, started, what makes a champion, and much more. Plus hold your own Olympics, design an Olympic kit, and make a board game!

STORY BOOKS etc

When Granny won Olympic GoldWhen Granny won Olympic gold and other medal-winning poems
This is a lively collection of poetry for 8-12 year olds. It includes plenty of humorous rhymes along with some moving and thought-provoking poems, and features all kinds of writing styles – from haiku to limericks.

The Moo-lympic GamesThe Moo-lympic games, by Stephen Cole
When Little Bo Vine and her brother Pat are captured by the evil F.B.I. ter-moo-nators and taken back to ancient Greece at the time of the ancient Olympic Games, Professor McMoo follows, determined to rescue them. But with the ter-moo-nators plotting to win every event, and take over the world, the C.I.A have got a challenge ahead.

Olympia the Games FairyOlympia the games fairy, by Daisy Meadows
Kirsty and Rachel are on a day out to watch a triathlon – a three-part race where the athletes have to swim, cycle and run. But when the competitors start swimming round in circles, it’s clear that all is not well. Olympia, the games fairy, appears and explains that Jack Frost is to blame.

Wheels of Fire, by Robert RigbyWheels of fire, by Robert Rigby
Rory Temu is unstoppable on his battered BMX. Weaving and dodging through the Edinburgh streets, there’s no obstacle he won’t tackle. Such brilliance on a bike could take Rory far – maybe even to Olympic heights, so his teacher believes. But a gang on the streets has been watching too – and the members have their own plans for Rory.

Blood RunnerBlood runner, by James Riordan
Samuel’s parents and sister, innocent bystanders, are killed by South African police. Samuel is sent to live with his uncle where he discovers he can run faster than anyone. Years later, after the end of Apartheid, Samuel is selected as the token black South African athlete to run in the Olympics.

[Malcolm]

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2 responses to “Olympics for children

  1. Pingback: Save our stories! | Books & the City

  2. Pingback: More Olympics books for kids | Books & the City

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