200 years of Dickens’ social conscience

So, Charles Dickens didn’t put his wife into an asylum – but he did separate from her and destroy her happiness; he was a family man and loved and supported his children – but he did send all the boys far away as young men; he was famous and rich at a very young age – but he worked himself to death unnecessarily.

Lucinda Dickens Hawksley, the great-great-great granddaughter of Charles Dickens, at Mayfair LibraryWe learnt these facts and anecdotes from a fascinating talk at Mayfair Library by Lucinda Dickens Hawksley, the great-great-great granddaughter of Charles Dickens.  Lucinda is an author in her own right and has written biographies about artists and models from the pre-Raphaelite period, travel and history of London books as well as her fabulous book on Dickens published for his bi-centenary.

Lucinda was very pleased with the lovely audience of 43 who had many questions, and she has suggested she come back in the autumn and talk about her other passion – the pre-Raphaelite artists, to tie in with the exhibition opening at Tate Britain in September.

Look out for further details – you heard it here first!

[Katrina]

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One response to “200 years of Dickens’ social conscience

  1. Pingback: Mayfair muses | Books & the City

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